• Emergency Prep,  Supporting Small Farms

    Befriend Your Local Farmer, a Food Shortage is Coming

    You know I love farmers. I understand their hard life, and what it’s like to labor all day and into the evening, only to sit at a farmer’s market and make $20. Farming is hard life, and, as I shared before, farmers aren’t rich, at least, monetarily. One thing that farmers are rich in is FOOD. I’m thinking about our life on the farm and how, right outside our door, we had free-range chickens, producing year-round eggs. My then-farmer husband (he’s still my husband, just, not a farmer anymore ;)), milked our cows Violet and Snap Dragon, twice per day. Two cows produce far more milk than a family needs,…

  • Animals,  Farms,  Supporting Small Farms,  Vegetables

    Friday Farm Photos: Can I Share Your Farm?

    If you have been following my blog for a while, you know that we once owned a farm where we raised pastured, soy-free, corn-free chickens, hens for eggs, a few dairy cows, pigs, geese, ducks, turkeys & a pretty big garden. We worked really hard, and made some stupid, newbie mistakes along the way. Jumping into farming, without previous experience or education, is quite a learning curve! We had a quick, on-farm education and then the realization that we weren’t going to make it at farming any longer and had to sell our farm. See the photo above? It is one of my favorite shots of the land that was…

  • Supporting Small Farms

    Support Small Farms: Become their Social Media Manager

    Social Media is an important part of running a small business. It’s important for small farms, too. The problem is, most farmers don’t have time for social media marketing. And, they may not know the ins and outs of it, because they haven’t spent many hours there. Do you enjoy social media? Do you have a good understanding of how to write posts and share photos? I think you can do this. The photo below is unrealistic, frankly: No farmer would be out in the field, holding an iPad, a cell phone, and running a farm successfully. The truth is, farming takes more hours than exist in a day! Really. Farmers…

  • Supporting Small Farms

    Fighting for the Access to Local Food: My Interview with an FTCLDF Attorney

    Yesterday I had the privilege of interviewing Pete Kennedy from the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund. Today marks seven years that the FTCLDF has been fighting for the rights of farmers and consumers. I learned a lot from Pete, and I’d like to share what I learned with you: Brenda: So, what are some of the common legal issues that farmers have been dealing with lately, and how has the FTCLDF been involved? Pete: The main overriding theme is overregulation, and regulations that aren’t necessary for farmers to produce a healthy product. There are two food systems right now: the industrial food system, and the local food system. I think the safest…

  • Supporting Small Farms

    How to Bless a Farmer

    Typing this up made me cry….For us, and the fact that our “farm dream” didn’t work out….and for other farmers who are struggling. They work SO hard. Trust me, I know.  Treat them well. Do you want to see a change in our food system? BE THE CHANGE. How to Bless a Farmer 1. Visit the farm and buy something Most farmers will welcome visitors, unless it is a really busy season. We had to limit visitors to one day per week because we needed to get work done on the farm. Ask your local farmer when it might be a good time to stop by. Some farms will have a…

  • Supporting Small Farms

    Farmer’s Market Purchases, 6/7

      We love going to the farmer’s market. It makes us want to be farmers again. 🙂 We are happy to talk to the other farmers and learn what they’re doing–and support them. I encourage all of you–everyone–go to the farmer’s market. Support your local farmers. Even if they don’t do things perfectly (as you would if you were the farmer), support them. Small farms are dying. We know first hand how hard it is to survive on a small farm income. These people are the hardest workers you will ever meet–and they’re providing good food. Go, shake their hands. Ask about their farm. Ask if they’ll be back to…